Salmon, Sockeye

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Sustainability Rating:Green – Best Choice What:Also known as Red Salmon, Sockeye are harvested from a variety of areas, including the well known Copper River and Bristol Bay runs. When:Available fresh spring – fall, Frozen year-round Where/How:Where – Alaska and Canada How – Wild Caught via Gill Net     Back to Product Guide Characteristics Bristol Bay, Alaska, has the largest …

Shark (Pacific), Mako

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Sustainability Rating:Red – Avoid What:Shortfin Mako Shark harvested from the Pacific When:Available Sporadically Year-Round Where/How:Where – USA (California) How – Wild Caught/Large Mesh Drift Gillnet   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Mako Shark has a full flavor and a firm, meaty texture similar to Swordfish (Mako Shark skin is rough and swordfish skin is smooth). For Your Menu Shark works well on …

Salmon (Wild), King

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Sustainability Rating:Multiple Ratings What:Also known as chinook, king salmon are the largest of the 5 commercially harvested species from the N. Pacific and can reach weights up to 125 lbs. (they are also the least abundant, and in general, the most expensive). Although Copper River kings tend to get the most press, we source king salmon from different areas as …

Sole, Petrale

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Sustainability Rating:Yellow – Good Alternative What:This tasty flat fish is called a sole, even though it’s technically a flounder… When:Available year-round Where/How:Where – Oregon, Washington, Canada, California How – Wild caught, trawl   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Fine textured fillets with a sweet, delicately nutty flavor.  Pliable fillets lend themselves well to stuffing, although they are somewhat delicate. Alternatives include Dover …

Smelt

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Sustainability Rating:Yellow – Good Alternative What:Think of smelt as tasty freshwater sardines! When:Available Year-Round Where/How:Where – Canada, USA How – Wild Caught/Gillnet, Trawl   Back to Product Guide Characteristics These frozen smelt have a delicate sweet taste and range from 3 – 5”. They come packed in 11/1# units. For Your Menu Delicious deep fried, some call them “fries with …

Oysters, Skookum

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Sustainability Rating:Green – Best Choice What:Farm raised Pacific oysters When:Available Year-Round Where/How:Where – Puget Sound How – Farm Raised   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Grown in the shallow waters of Little Skookum basin (Puget Sound, WA) these oysters are more sweet than briny, with soft, delicate meats that they owe to their gently brackish upbringing. For Your Menu Whether …

Tuna, Skipjack

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Sustainability Rating:Yellow – Good Alternative What:Skipjack is a prolific member of the tuna family and is one of the world’s most important capture fisheries. When:Available year-round Where/How:How – Wild Caught/Longline Yellow – Good Alternative   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Skipjack tuna can be found canned, smoked, dried, fresh or frozen. It’s a popular sushi fish (katsu) and is a …

Skate

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Sustainability Rating:Red – Avoid What:We refer to the edible fins of the skate as “wings”. When:Available Year-Round Where/How:Where – Virginia, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine How – Trawl   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Skate has a flavor somewhat similar to scallops – a fact that seems to support unfounded rumors that round pieces cut from large skate wings used to be …

Scallops, Sea

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Sustainability Rating:Yellow – Good Alternative What:Wild harvested from the Atlantic from Massachusetts to Canada, this delicious bi-valve has long been a menu staple.  Dry pack scallops are not treated with chemical additives. When:Available Year-Round Where/How:Where – Massachusetts, Maine, Canada How – Wild Caught/Dredge   Back to Product Guide Characteristics Scallops have a sweet, uniquely rich taste.  Before cooking, their meat is …

Sardines

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Sustainability Rating:Green – Best Choice What:Wild Caught Sardines According to NOAA, “The West Coast Pacific sardine fishery was first developed during World War I to fill an increased demand for nutritious food that could be canned and easily carried onto battlefields. The fishery rapidly expanded, and by the 1940s Pacific sardine supported the largest fishery in the Western Hemisphere, with …